Video: Emma Donoghue’s The Lotterys Plus One trailer

HarperCollins Canada is marking the publication of The Lotterys Plus One, Irish-Canadian author Emma Donoghue’s first children’s book, with a stylin’ book trailer (featuring art by Lotterys illustrator Caroline Hadilaksono), and Quill & Quire gets to do the big reveal. Check it out:

 
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Book Links: Books for people who liked Sassy | Tolkien reads from Rings

(Electric Literature)
Babies named Romeo and Juliet born 18 hours apart in same hospital. (Mashable)
Archie Comics trademarks cute names for Betty-Jughead romance. (Book Riot)
100 books for people who loved Sassy magazine. (The Huffington Post) 2017 PEN Literary Award winners announced. Tolkien read Lord of the Rings. (Bleeding Cool)
Why you should read a book series out of order. (Book Riot)
Listen to J.R.R.

IFOA’s Geoffrey Taylor honoured by French government as Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres

Awarded three times each year, the recognition is given to people who have distinguished themselves in the area of arts and letters, with a specific focus on contributions to French culture. Geoffrey Taylor, the director of the Toronto Harbourfront International Festival of Authors, has been bestowed with a particularly prestigious international honour. Taylor has been named Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the government of France. Burroughs. “I am honoured that my name will be listed amongst so many of those I admire who have already received this distinction.”
Charles Baillie, IFOA president, says, “An international acknowledgement of this stature helps draw awareness to the extraordinary work Geoffrey, as director of the International Festival of Authors, has undertaken in Canada and abroad to promote culture and the arts.”
Canadian writers who have been named Chevaliers include Margaret Atwood, John Ralston Saul, and Jane Urquhart. 24, fittingly right in the middle of this year’s IFOA. A ceremony to award the medal will take place on Oct. “It is truly incredible to be recognized by the Republic of France for my contributions to the world of literature,” says Taylor. Taylor joins international authors such as Elif Safak, Lyudmila Ulitskaya, and William S. Geoffrey Taylor
As director of the annual IFOA, Taylor has been responsible for bringing writers and other cultural ambassadors from France and around the world to appear each October at the Toronto festival.

Book Links: Offerman, Mullally acquire Lincoln in the Bardo | James Patterson’s biggest fan

(NPR)
Chet Cunningham, author of 450 books, enemy to writer’s block, dies. Z: The Beginning of Everything tells the story of Zelda Fitzgerald. (Electric Literature) (The New York Times)
James Patterson gets awesome blurb from James Patterson. (Los Angeles Times)
Meet the gay, Latina superhero written by a gay, Latina writer. (The Digital Reader)
Nick Offerman, Megan Mullally acquire George Saunders’s Lincoln in the Bardo.

The 7 Stages of Being a Writer (How Many Have You Experienced?)

Weiland: a fighter, a writer, a child of God. Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Kobo | Apple | Smashwords | My Store

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I stared into the black maw of this question and all its implications and came this close to giving it all up. I’m quite happy to say I no longer agree with everything I wrote back then (which is why a number of posts have been deleted or extensively rewritten). 2. The second thing you must do is this: Keep your head down and keep working. http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/kmweiland.com/podcast/7-stages-of-being-a-writer.mp3
Click the “Play” button to Listen to Audio Version (or subscribe to the Helping Writers Become Authors podcast in iTunes). What are some of the major stages of being a writer that you’ve experienced so far? You know you’ve taken your first step into the larger world of writing when you come to realize, first of all, that you don’t know anything, and, secondly, you then begin to know what it is you don’t know. 4. Not only are we baring our souls on the page for everyone to gawk at, we are also working in a field in which monetary compensation is decidedly the primary yardstick for “success.”
What this means, of course, is that in the early days when we’re not making any money, getting any publishing deals, selling any books, or otherwise getting anyone to pay any attention to us whatsoever—we will almost inevitably fight the little green-eyed monster as we watch many, many other authors reach the milestones we aspire to. Salvatore says:
If you can quit, then quit. I felt guilty for telling people they had to leave me alone during writing time. Even better, it’s encouraging, because it means the boulders we all trip over, the mosquitoes we all have to swat, the bears we sometimes have to run from—they don’t last forever. I Can’t Read Other Writers Because They’ll Influence My Voice
The struggle for authors to find their own unique “voices” can be an all-out, feathers-flying, banty-hen kind of a fight in the early years. Is it really a worthy lifetime’s pursuit? Take a walk into the dark night of your soul. And I can promise you this: as time goes by and you increase in your understanding of the craft as a whole and your own body of work in particular, the sting of harsh critiques and bad reviews will wear off. If life is a journey and writing is a lifestyle, then we know writing itself is not a destination but a discovery. Certainly what you wrote last year is likely to be worse than what you’re writing this year. Maybe Writing Really Isn’t Worth It and I Should Quit
Hey, just because you’re now a writer doesn’t mean this gig is suddenly easy! How to Overcome This Roadblock:
The first thing you must do is come to peace with your own priorities and your own explicit definitions of success and failure. During the publication of my first two novels, I struggled mightily with feeling like a fraud because they were not traditionally published—until I came to peace with what I wanted from my writing career rather than what I felt others might expect from me. Brutally-honest critique partners and editors leave us sitting dazed and wounded, staring at the litter of Track Changes in our manuscripts. Every part of the adventure offers its own challenges, struggles, and doubts. I believe this is an important question for every artist to ask themselves at some point in their journey. Last week, I received an email from reader Cassie Gustafson who perfectly summed up this plateau in the writing life:
I find myself feeling guilty because I’m not writing (which is the worst!), or feeling guilty because I am and have to ignore friends/cat/hubby/social engagements owing to a deadline, or feeling guilty because I didn’t start early enough in my day. Some of them don’t make sense right away. In short, this isn’t actually a roadblock you “overcome.” Stick with those rules, keep digging away at your understanding of the bigger picture—and eventually, their importance, their (I might even call it) kindness, and their exciting possibilities will put to rest both the obsessiveness and the frustration. Make this commitment and from that moment on, you are a writer. Tell me in the comments! If you aren’t influenced by the masters, then you may only be influenced by yourself. I felt guilty for wanting to write rather than ride my horses. I Feel Guilty for Taking Time to Write (and Then I Feel Guilty for Not Taking Time to Write)
I still remember the agony of indecision in those early years when I started taking my writing seriously. Don’t worry about what others are doing. You realize there is much to learn about the art and craft of writing a powerful story, and you begin your life’s pursuit of diligently seeking it—sometimes joyously, sometimes painfully, but always doggedly. At this point in my writing journey, I am no longer dependent upon the good opinion of others for my validation as an author or a person. I love the rules! How to Overcome This Roadblock:
As blissful as this particular bit of ignorance may be, remaining entrenched within it will take the wheels off your writing journey right here and now. And then when I gave in to my guilt and didn’t write, oh boy, there was that whole other wave of guilt to deal with. How to Overcome This Roadblock:
The problem here is that reading other writers is, in fact, the single most valuable way to find our voices, to absorb the rhythms of great storytelling, and to learn by example from the best of the best. We could fill a book with beloved quotes from other writers (many of them acknowledged masters of the craft) about their own doubts about their abilities, about their struggles with the simple act of getting words onto the page, about their depression when the stories they produced inevitability failed to measure up to the magic in their heads. And that’s fine. Perhaps you’ve only passed a few them so far. But every one of these challenges will find an exciting and invaluable resolution. But I also   worked incredibly hard so I’d be in a position to take advantage of those opportunities. Some of the stages of being a writer are momentous, life-changing, and unforgettable. Some of us will face this conundrum many times in our writing journeys. Keep walking, keep writing. John Dufresne says it eloquently in The   Lie That Tells a Truth:
Don’t be afraid to be influenced by any writer whom you admire. For me, the turning point was a moment in which I found myself angry that family and friends weren’t taking my writing and my writing time seriously. Perhaps it never completely disappears. How to Overcome This Roadblock:
If you follow me on Facebook and Twitter, you’ve probably noticed that on Wednesdays I always share a post from the site’s archives. I felt guilty for sitting at my desk instead of doing more “productive” work. 3. Other Writers Are Getting All the Breaks—And It Makes Me Sad/Depressed/Jealous/Angry
The art of writing is uniquely suited to make us feel unworthy. Most of us don’t even know what a “voice” is, much less what our voice is, so we do a lot of flailing around, trying to find it. (Outlines, story structure, and character arcs were like that for me.) Other discoveries blur past, lost in the hustle and grunt of our forward momentum. Is it what I’m meant to do? Sign Up Today It was a long road to get here (and indeed the road continues on), but it was worth every difficult step along the way. With every word you write, you are getting better. But most of us (*raises hand*) start out writing with the blithe mindset that this is easy, this is fun, and my stories are really, really good. In the beginning, your writing probably is pretty bad. 5. With few meaningful exceptions, writing is first—come rain, shine, holidays, or illness. It isn’t the final peak by any means. It truly has nothing to do with you or the possibilities for your future. I Am a Writing Genius! 6. How to Overcome This Roadblock:
Just keep writing. Understand what you want to achieve with your writing and, more importantly, why. For me (so far), it was an unforgettable one-time epoch. I started with the blog’s very first post and have been slowly working backwards, post by post, through what has become a very large backlist. Then the book comes out and the reviews start coming in—some of them positive, but many of them candid, angry, even cruel (and you will remember these comments far more than the positive ones). I used to get the shakes and a sick feeling in my stomach whenever I found a negative review of one of my books on Amazon. But it has provided one of those rare moments in the writing journey that allow the writer to turn back and look down upon the road so far—to realize I have grown, I am not the same writer I was when I started. Whatever you find, you’ll be a different person when you come out, and if you decide to keep right on writing, then what you find will fuel your art for the rest of forever. Now, I can glance at them, accept the person’s right to his opinion, perhaps even grin in amusement, and forget about it almost instantly. I look back on my writing journey and I am incredibly aware of the opportunities I was blessed to be given. We don’t need any help doubting ourselves—but we get plenty of help anyway. I look forward to seeing you on the mountain peak, so together we can journey on to still greater heights! Wordplayers, tell me your opinion! And what hurts most of all is the dark belief, down deep in your heart, that it’s all true. As a result, many writers seesaw back and forth between obsessively observing all rules to the absolute letter of their perception—and then getting frustrated, deciding “art” isn’t supposed to governed by “rules” anyway, and chucking them all out the window. If you’re going to spend the rest of your life doing that, then you really should spend some time contemplating the nature of your commitment. Sometimes I even felt guilty just because it was a beautiful day outside and I was inside. What if it’s TRUE??? Perhaps you recognize the current battleground where you find yourself struggling, bleeding, and moving forward step by step. Sometimes, within that fight, we become fearful that reading other writers will somehow warp or contaminate our own fledgling voices. But you’re getting better. It all hurts. If you can’t quit, you’re a writer. But the “writing rules” can get overwhelming fast. That’s exciting. 7 Stages of Being a Writer You Must Overcome
Today, I want to take moment to look back over some of the stages of being a writer that can be the biggest obstacles in the first leg of the artistic journey—and show you how you too can navigate past them on your way up the mountain. From that moment on, writing became a priority in my life. Do not judge yourself by someone else’s yardstick. How to Overcome This Roadblock:
Let’s be honest: maybe you won’t overcome this one. Indeed, I’m not even close to being the same person. Some of them don’t work at all until we come to subsequent understandings about other storytelling principles. The reason it hurts is that is true, whether to a small or large measure. 1. Wherever you are in the stages of being a writer, remember the path leads ever onward and upward. Perhaps you now find yourself high enough on the mountain to look back and smile at the memory of all of these stops along your path. How to Overcome This Roadblock:
This is where the rubber really meets the road, people. I Must Religiously Follow All the Rules (Except That’s Too Hard, So, You Know What?, the Rules Are Obviously Formulaic Cockamamie Created by Talentless Hacks, So I’ll Just Ignore Them, Phew!)
Way back when we overcame Roadblock #1 and realized all the stuff we didn’t know, it actually seemed pretty exciting—comforting even—to discover there was a method to the madness of writing. I can see many a misty mountain looming in the distance. We should be flattered if anyone notices a similarity between our little story and, say, a passage from Melville. But they’re every bit as formative and important. I believe this is actually an incredibly valuable starting mindset, since it prevents discouragement from setting in until after we are well and truly hooked by the addictive nature of creativity. This spring, I find myself at what feels like a mountain peak within my writing journey. The spring after I finished what would become my second published book Behold the Dawn, I faced down a quandary of the soul: Am I really meant to be a writer? If you’re really going to be a writer—if you’re going to make this whole creative lifestyle thing work—this is where it either happens or it doesn’t. I’ll Never Be a Good Writer
This is often the most tenacious belief any of us ever has to face. 7. But then it hit me: why should they take it seriously when   I wasn’t? Indeed, this entire site is dedicated to sharing those “rules.” But with time has also come the equanimity of approaching those rules from the larger understanding of where they apply, where they don’t, and where it’s okay to experiment. Success only comes to those who make it happen. What is absolutely true is that you’ll never be a perfect writer. Some of us are wise enough to skip this gem altogether. One of the subjects I’ve decidedly changed my views on with time and experience is the value of “the rules”—which is to say, the foundation of established wisdom gleaned from centuries of humanity’s storytelling. As R.A. Creating is about sticking your fist down deep in your soul, ruthlessly clawing at whatever you can find, and then dragging out to be shared in the shocking light of day. Maybe you’ll decide that no, writing isn’t worth it, and you’ll walk away. I set up the same daily writing schedule I’ve followed ever since: two hours a day, five days a week.

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WEILAND’S ELETTER AND RECEIVE A FREE EBOOK I think what gave me the breakthrough was realising that my training as an engineer was applicable to writing as well. Constructing a machine and building a story have a lot in common. Weiland lives in make-believe worlds, talks to imaginary friends, and survives primarily on chocolate truffles and espresso. The parts must fit together and work together, but each part must be as well-made as possible. Now I’m pseudonymously pecking away at my fictional tale. Reply

R Billing says:

March 27, 2017 at 5:12 am

Another wonderful post, thanks! Later I applied my coding and analytical skills to my hobby and became publicly known as a thinker and writer on the topic. She is the IPPY and NIEA Award-winning and internationally published author of the Amazon bestsellers Outlining Your Novel and Structuring Your Novel. I’m a little different in that, while fiction writing is new to me (even if into it’s third year) I have previous experience in creative fields. Notify me of new posts by email. Believe me, I have been to all seven, several times. Related PostsGreat Gift for Writers! Weiland | @KMWeilandK.M. What I have learned about writing from fiction has helped me organize my thoughts and communicate more effectively in everything from instant reactions in conversations and on Twitter to technical presentations and writing. There is a big structure and inside it a lot of small structures. Subscribe to Blog Updates:

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SIGN UP FOR K.M. At first I toiled rather anonymously in my office coding software as needed. Comments

Joe Long says:

March 27, 2017 at 4:32 am

I copied & pasted the bullet points and will check back in later with some responses, but I wanted to open with a few general comments. She writes historical and speculative fiction from her home in western Nebraska and mentors authors on her award-winning website. Helping Writers Become AuthorsHow to Outline Your Novel
How to Structure Your Story
How to Write Character Arcs
How to Structure Scenes
Most Common Writing Mistakes
Storytelling According to Marvel

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Katherena Vermette, David Bergen, Ma-Nee Chacaby nominated for Manitoba Book Awards

A full list of nominees in all categories are available on the awards website. The winners will be announced April 22. This year, juries in 18 categories read 127 English- and French-language books submitted by Canadian publishers. Katherena Vermette’s Governor General’s Literary Award–nominated novel The Break (House of Anansi Press) is nominated for the Margaret Laurence Award for Fiction against four other titles, including David Bergen’s The Stranger (HarperCollins). The awards, which represent a purse of more than $30,000, honour books written or published by Manitobans, focused on Manitoba subjects or published in the province. The Manitoba Book Awards have announced the shortlists for its 2016 prizes. Ma-Nee Chacaby’s A Two-Spirit Journey: The Autobiography of a Lesbian Ojibwa-Cree Elder (University of Manitoba Press) – which was recently nominated for Lambda Literary and Publishing Triangle awards – is shortlisted for the Mary Scorer Award for Best Book by a Manitoba Publisher.
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Book Links: Oxford updates a Canadian dictionary | 161-year-old bookstore moves on-line

(Lit Reactor)
Emma Roberts on why she started a book club. (Entertainment Weekly)

  (NPR)
The Chuck Berry-iest opening chapter   in literature. (The New Yorker)
A 161-year-old bookstore in Boston moves online. Oxford updates Canadian dictionary (just not the one you’re thinking of). (Melville House)
The Handmaid’s Tale   and Nineteen Eighty-four   get hardcover reissues. (Publishers Weekly)
Eight reasons writers should avoid the novel and focus on short stories.

Find Out When It’s a Good Idea to Use a Made-Up Setting

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Tell me in the comments! 2 Advantages and Disadvantages of a Made-Up Setting
1. 4. 3. Take time early on to consider if grounding your story in a real-life setting is worth the research. Why did you choose it? Wordplayers, tell me your opinion! A Real-Life Setting Is Instantly Recognizable
Even if readers have never visited Yorkshire, most will recognize the name and conjure up certain associations that will help them fill in the blanks and build the setting within their imaginations. The answer is: it depends. 6 Advantages and Disadvantages of a Real-Life Setting
1. 6. There is absolutely nothing amiss with creating a made-up setting for your story—and this holds true whether you’re writing fantasy set within an entirely imaginary world or very realistic fiction set within our world. Because even the most realistic of made-up settings will always lack the added punch of being real, your attention to detail must be even more obsessive than usual. Real-Life Settings Require More Research
If you choose to forego the creative demands of creating a brand-new setting, you will bear a greater responsibility for establishing an accurate portrayal. Too often, writers take the old adage “write what you know” to mean they should never do anything so rash as to, you know, make stuff up. Or would the freedom of a made-up setting be worth the potential sacrifice of authenticity? It doesn’t even mean you can’t create made-up settings within real settings—or alter bits of your real setting to suit the needs of your story. A Real-Life Setting Offers Built-In Verisimilitude
The very fact that your setting is a real place gives readers a firmer belief in it and all the story events that happen there. Both have their advantages and disadvantages, all of which should be considered before making a decision. 2. Writers will need to choose between specifying a real-life setting or slapping a name on a made-up one. A Real-Life Setting May Invite Criticism
You’ll also have to deal with the possibility that real-life people living in your real-life setting may not like how you’ve portrayed them or their home. Sign Up Today 2. ***
In most instances, the choice between a real-life setting and a made-up setting won’t significantly affect your plot (for example, Batman could just as easily have lived in New York City as its made-up doppelgänger Gotham). Have you ever used a made-up setting in your story? At the very least, shouldn’t you adhere to reality whenever a corresponding reality exists, as, for example, when it comes to the choice between a real-life setting and a made-up setting? All you have to do is record what you see or learn. But let’s get something out of the way right off. A Real-Life Setting Demands Accuracy
Get something wrong, and some reader, somewhere, will notice. To some extent, all stories include made-up settings, even if it’s only a street or a house. A Made-Up Setting Demands Active Creativity
With the power of total creation comes total accountability. The choice is up to you. If you want to get a little wilder (as you almost certainly will if you’re writing speculative fiction), a made-up setting gives you the power to alter whole swatches of reality. But, in application, the decision will affect every page of your story. A Real-Life Setting Requires Less Brainstorming
Because the facts are already there for you to draw upon, you won’t have to worry about creating a real-life setting from scratch. A Made-Up Setting Frees You From the Burden of the Facts
If you want to maintain the verisimilitude of a real-life town, but need to tweak a few minor details, all you have to do is rename it. 5.
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SIGN UP FOR K.M. Weiland lives in make-believe worlds, talks to imaginary friends, and survives primarily on chocolate truffles and espresso. She is the IPPY and NIEA Award-winning and internationally published author of the Amazon bestsellers Outlining Your Novel and Structuring Your Novel. Related PostsAre You Utilizing Ugly Settings?4 Ways to Choose the Right Story SettingThe Importance of a Fabulous SettingLearn How NOT to Waste Your Story Setting’s Full Potential About K.M. Weiland | @KMWeilandK.M. WEILAND’S ELETTER AND RECEIVE A FREE EBOOK Helping Writers Become AuthorsHow to Outline Your Novel
How to Structure Your Story
How to Write Character Arcs
How to Structure Scenes
Most Common Writing Mistakes
Storytelling According to Marvel

Now Available! Notify me of new posts by email. She writes historical and speculative fiction from her home in western Nebraska and mentors authors on her award-winning website.
Weiland: a fighter, a writer, a child of God. I write historical and speculative fiction and mentor authors. Read More I’m the award-winning and internationally published author of the bestselling Outlining Your Novel and Structuring Your Novel. Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Kobo | Apple | Smashwords | My Store

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Book Links: Webster’s word archive | Jane Austen’s fake marriages | Colour-readers?

(Book Riot)
Is colour coming to e-readers? Ghost in the Shell

A look inside Merriam-Webster’s word archive. (Publishing Perspectives)
Amazon ups its counterfeit-removal program. (Open Culture)
Art Spiegelman   on Nazis, facists, and despair. (The Millions)
CBC’s Ann Jansen discusses Canada Reads’ past, present, and future. (The New York Times)
An oral history of a guy who wrote a book and tried to get his friends to read it. (The Digital Reader)
Jane Austen apparently wrote two fake marriage announcements for herself. (The Huffington Post)
Camus on why happiness is like committing a crime. (A.V. (Open Book)
One reader’s quest to visit every bookstore in New York. (Literary Hub) (Good e-Reader)
Paramount releases first five minutes of Ghost in the Shell adaptation. Club)
British comic publishers talk about transition and growth in the industry.

Book Links: Inspector Morse creator Colin Dexter dies | Famous literary walls | 25 gateway poets

(Entertainment Weekly)
Famous literary walls. A high-steaks mystery: who’s leaving A.1. (The Millions)
Swamp Thing co-creator Bernie Wrightson dies. (Los Angeles Times)
This week in “ebooks aren’t selling as well as print”: ebooks still aren’t selling as well as print (not even close). (The Huffington Post)
Reviews of three new graphic novels. (Good e-Reader)
Colin Dexter, creator of Inspector Morse, dies at 86. (The Digital Reader)
Jamie Lee Curtis responds to selfie craze with selfie-themed picture book for kids. (Book Riot)
Apple’s flagging tablet sales are shoppers’ rewards, as company drops price. (The Globe and Mail)
Author, songwriter, game show, self-proclaimed assassin Chuck Barris dies. (BBC)
Archie comic teases a major death. Again. (The New York Times) sauce in an Ohio library? (Entertainment Weekly)
Twenty-five gateway poets.

Al-Solaylee, Blatchford, Richler up for Shaughnessy Cohen Prize

The winner, who receives $25,000, will be announced at the Politics and the Pen gala in Ottawa on   May 10. Five titles, representing a diverse range of subjects, have been nominated for the Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing, administered by the Writers’   Trust of Canada. The finalists are:

Kamal Al-Solaylee, Brown: What Being Brown in the World Today Means (To Everyone) (HarperCollins Canada)
Christie Blatchford, Life Sentence: Stories from Four Decades of Court Reporting – Or, How I Fell Out of Love with the Canadian Justice System (Especially Judges) (Doubleday Canada)
Ian McKay and Jamie Swift, The Vimy Trap: Or, How We Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Great War (Between the Lines)
James McLeod, Turmoil, as Usual: Politics in Newfoundland and Labrador and the Road to the 2015 Election (Creative Publishers)
Noah Richler, The Candidate: Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail (Doubleday Canada) The finalists were selected by a jury   comprising   CBC foreign correspondent Nahlah Ayed, National Post columnist Colby Cosh, and   former Member of Parliament Megan Leslie.

Book Links: NY Review of Books editor Robert Silvers dies | Publishing lessons learned from a porn shop

(Avenue)
Anthony Burgess’s “lost” novels. (The Atlantic)
Literary classics in six seconds. (Good e-Reader)
Chuck Berry also wrote a great memoir. Founding New York Review of Books editor Robert Silvers dies. (Melville House)
What’s so “American” about John Milton’s devil? (The Independent)
Digital manga sales increased by 27 per cent last year. (The New York Times)
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First-edition Harlequins on display at University of Calgary. (Then Guardian)
An obituary for Lucky Peach magazine. (Melville House)
Ten publishing lessons gleaned from managing a porn shop.

Literary event listings, March 20–26, 2017

Hotel Dallavalle, 142 Queen St., Niagara on the Lake, Ont. 3 p.m. Market Hall Performing Arts Centre, 140 Charlotte St., Toronto. Please include within the body of your email: name of event/featured author, a brief description, venue, street address, city, start time, cost of admission, and contact phone number or website. $5. Free
TUESDAY, MARCH 21
Art Bar Poetry Series: With Jane Byers, Mark Sampson, and Nicole Saltz, plus an open mic. Free Times Café, 320 College St., Toronto. Flying Pony Café, 1481 Gerrard St. Greenaway: Book signing. $39.95
Send listings for any Canadian literary events to   events@quillandquire.com. Otter Books, 398 Baker St., Nelson, B.C. MONDAY, MARCH 20
Lisa Robertston: Reading from her new book, 3 Summers. Events must be received by noon Thursday for the following week’s listings. Q&Q is happy to list general information for literary festivals, but cannot list individual sessions. Brigantine Room, Harbourfront Centre, 235 Queens Quay W., Toronto. 7:30 p.m. Knife Fork Book in Rick’s Café, 281 Augusta Ave., Toronto. artbar.org
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22
Steve Burrows and Steven Heighton: Reading and about their new books, A Shimmer of Hummingbirds and The Nightingale Won’t Let You Sleep. 7 p.m. 11 a.m. Lorna Schultz Nicholson: All-ages family themed literary evening and Italian-style dinner by Bella Vita Ristorante. Free
R.M. Chapters South Keys, 2210 Bank St., Ottawa. $10
THURSDAY, MARCH 23
Steve Paikin: On his experience writing Bill Davis’s biography. E., Toronto. 7 p.m. 8 p.m. Free
SUNDAY, MARCH 26
Draft Reading Series: With Marusya Bociurkiw, Puneet Dutt, Waubgeshig Rice, and Catriona Wright. 5 p.m. 2 p.m. Free
SATURDAY, MARCH 25
Robert Fowler: Signing copies of his new book, Combat Mission.

Book Links: Harlequin launches new romance imprint | Donald Trump masters osmosis

(Literary Hub) (Entertainment Weekly)
A look at   Bibliotech’s latest   – and largest   – bookless library. Harlequin launches new romance imprint Dare,   as Blaze line shutters. (Techdirt)
Avid reader   Donald Trump   “looking at a book,”   apparently can absorb content   by osmosis. (The New York Times)
How cover of   The Handmaid’s Tale   has evolved over 30 years. (The Independent)
Ann Goldstein on translating Elena Ferrante. (Aldine)
Anne of Green Gables represents Canada on   literary world map. (BookRiot)
Morrissey retcons his lonely youth into a questionable statement on civil rights via a T-shirt   featuring author and activist James Baldwin. (The Digital Reader)
Shakespeare’s drafts were pretty rough. (Hazlitt)
Because no one demanded it: Black Eyed Peas to write   graphic novel. (The Guardian)
Bill Gates and others invest $52.6 million into site for unauthorized copies of academic papers. (Esquire)
Chelsea Clinton to write   She Persisted, a   picture book of   historical women’s stories.

9 Tips for How to Write Opening and Closing Lines Readers Will Love to Quote

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What is supposed to happen is that the reader has to keep going to find out how and why. Reply

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Notify me of follow-up comments by email. They faded first from the aft edge of the flight deck window, reddening and dwindling away as the field took hold. The opening of Run From The Stars went through about four major rethinks before I settled on:
Lieutenant Jane Gould pressed the button firmly and the stars began to go out. 53: No Contractions in DialogueHow to Know When to Write The End About K.M. Then the orthodynamic drive lifted the ship right out of real space and she was looking at the other universe behind the darkness. I’m only sorry that I had to do it the hard way.’
What I’m trying to do is hint that in the sequel the stakes will be higher, the explosions bigger, and the peril even more deadly. Weiland lives in make-believe worlds, talks to imaginary friends, and survives primarily on chocolate truffles and espresso. Sixty thousand words later a somewhat battered but undeterred Jane speaks the last line:
‘Arthur Kelso is still out there somewhere. Notify me of new posts by email. Weiland | @KMWeilandK.M. When that trouble blows up you’re going to need me on operations, which is why I had to come back. She is the IPPY and NIEA Award-winning and internationally published author of the Amazon bestsellers Outlining Your Novel and Structuring Your Novel. WEILAND’S ELETTER AND RECEIVE A FREE EBOOK Does this hook you? She writes historical and speculative fiction from her home in western Nebraska and mentors authors on her award-winning website. Subscribe to Blog Updates:

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March 20, 2017 at 4:47 am

I know the problem. That is what happens…
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Actually, all four of the tips we’re looking at here are ways of hooking readers, getting them to sit up, take notice, and say,   Yes, this is a book I want to read. She said something in the vein   of:
The opening line should be brilliant. 4 Tips for How to   Write a Closing Line Readers Will Never Forget
My closing lines usually find themselves, but not before I experience several small moments of panic, wondering how I’m going to wind everything down in the final chapter and find the one perfect line that will definitively tell readers “this is THE END.” More than that, good closing lines must sum up your story (without being on the nose) and leave readers with exactly the right flavor. Go ahead—try it! 4 (and 1/2) Tips for How to Write an Opening Line That Shows Readers You’re the Boss
I carp a lot about how tough beginnings are. Look for ways to state your thematic premise   without stating it—perhaps by stating the opposite, or having characters talk around it, letting the subtextual truth hang heavy amidst the irony. 2. However, this second tip is the one most blatantly about hook-planting. Leverage Your Title
Okay, so I lied. If it’s not, why bother reading the rest of the book? Just as in life, one saga ends only so another can begin. This isn’t just another sentence in your story. 4. This is your one chance to   be brilliant in a way that is both memorable and useful (in that, if readers like this line, then, hey, they just might read the next one!). When you know where the story is going, you then have the ability to craft an opening line that asks all the right questions. 1. Occasionally, lightning will strike and the perfect line will zing from the ether to your brain to your Scrivener doc. But how to plant that hook is somewhat less clear. Wordplayers, tell me your opinion! This is the line that echoes in our mind when the story’s over.—John Dufresne
If you do it right, people will want to stop and read your last line over one more time just to savor it—and the experience of your wonderful novel as a whole. This is where your most powerful authorial weapons become even more valuable: symbolism, subtext, and irony. This is   the sentence. Show readers right from the start that   something is amiss in paradise. ***
Excellent opening and closing lines are loving touches from masterful authorial hands. Like the closing notes of a song, it must guide readers to a sense that the story is, indeed, over. That means you have an extra playing piece to work to your advantage. What do you find most challenging about how to write opening and closing lines for your story? (And all the angels sing!) But for all those times when you sit down in excitement to begin your amazing new story, only to spend the first hour staring at the blinking cursor, wondering how in tarnation to find an opening line that works, here are four tips to get your started. It brings your story full circle, leaves your readers with an indelible impression of your book, and, once again, proves whether or not you’re the master of your story. Your story can be amazing, but if you fail to share that in your opening line, how are readers ever going to know? Perhaps your opening and closing lines may even end up on most-quoted lists right alongside such luminaries as Austen, Melville, and Tolstoy! But you don’t want   too much finality. This is the one sentence, out of all your sentences, people might actually remember after they close the book. Reveal Your Story
Whenever possible tell the whole story of the novel in the first sentence.—John Irving
John Irving is famous for writing his closing line first, and that perhaps is the secret to his opening lines. Answer One Question, Raise Another
The finale of your story must answer your story’s most important questions—the Dramatic Question and the Thematic Question (about your plot and theme, respectively). Choose Your Best Line
The last line is as important as the first, if for different reasons. Ask a Question
Everybody knows the most important job of any opening line is that of hooking readersr. Although you never want to come out with an on-the-nose “moral of the story” or “this is what the story was really about”—you do want to take the opportunity to underscore the story behind the story. http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/kmweiland.com/podcast/9-tips-for-how-to-write-opening-and-closing-lines.mp3
Click the “Play” button to Listen to Audio Version (or subscribe to the Helping Writers Become Authors podcast in iTunes). Tell me in the comments! Pique their curiosity. But in most, you will want to ease your readers to the finale, usually with a series of longer sentences leading up to a final short sentence that puts the period on the whole book. Your opening must do more than hook readers, it must immediately fulfill the promise of your premise’s hook and thematic question. If you mismatched any of these titles and their opening lines, your first impression of all these stories would change drastically. 2. In some stories, a disorientingly abrupt ending may be appropriate. When I’m scanning an Amazon preview to decide if a book is going to be worth my time, the first test is always the opening line. 4. While it may not always be possible to introduce the protagonist by name (or even pronoun) in the very first line, you want, at the very least, to immediately introduce readers to this person via the narrative voice of the opening line. It must present a sense of finality. 4 1/2. Your title is. Look for Symbolism, Subtext, and Irony
Your closing line is arguably the most thematic of the entire story. Whether your character is so on-the-nose in observing a situation that she creates her own irony for more observant readers, or whether the character is ironic enough to prove her awareness of the drama about to unfold upon her—both can be shared subtextually with readers before the character herself is ever directly mentioned. That’s a lot of pressure to put on two little lines. Don’t open with: “The sun rose” or “Sam opened his eyes” or even “The battle raged on.” Look for color, depth, power, and specificity. Your first line will be read in the context of your title. Naturally, this doesn’t mean spelling out the entire plot (except for when it does). One of the top reasons beginnings are hard is because the entry point—the opening line—is perhaps the hardest part of all. Watch Your Rhythm
Unlike your opening line, your closing line will be under certain structural restraints. 3. In learning how to write opening and closing lines that delight readers, keep these nine (and a half) tips in mind and have fun creating something special. Avoid bland openings. 3. Example:
Note how all the above titles offer insight into their first lines. Create a sense of dichotomy, two different ideas juxtaposed against one another, creating a sense of disharmony that can range from the blatant to the ever-so-subtle subtextual. But no worries! Instead, you want to leave them the sense that the story and the characters will continue to live and breathe beyond the covers of the book. In short, that opening line better sparkle. Your title will become a   clue that helps readers interpret your first line. Even though   few people will read your closing line prior to finishing the book, it is still arguably the second most important line in the entire story, right after the first line. This means, if you use it right, your title can create one more layer of interesting irony, theme, and curiosity within your first line. Don’t write past it. Your opening line tells readers what your story is about. Even as you stamp “The End” on this story, leave readers with that sense that a new story is just beginning for your characters (whether you’re planning a sequel or not). Tone, in itself, can create the kind of hooking juxtaposition we talked about in #2—and, in turn, that skillful use of irony can add just the kind of brilliance mentioned in #3. Sign Up Today Be Brilliant
Long ago, writing friend Melissa Ortega made a comment about opening lines that has made her an angel on my shoulder, whispering in my ear, with every opening line I write. Look for thematic motifs you can pluck from earlier in the story to reinforce here at the end. You don’t want to completely slam the door on your readers’ experience of the story. End the story on your best, or second best, line. There’s actually a handy little checklist you can use when figuring out how to write opening and closing lines that will stick with readers long after their initial Amazon scan. But if you can’t come right out and say, “And so twoo wuv twiumphed again!”—how do you accomplish this? 1. It must tie off all the loose ends and satisfy your readers’ burning curiosity. Although you want to maintain a tone consistent with the rest of the book’s narrative, your final lines may be the most poetic in the entire story. Your opening line isn’t actually the first thing readers will read. They’re a sure sign their authors are aware of their stories, in control of their prose, and—as a result—very likely to be able to spin a story readers can trust in from beginning to end. Certainly, nowhere else are the poetic techniques of rhythm and meter more useful. Tell them something in that opening line that doesn’t   quite make sense. Get readers to ask a question about your story. Create a Voice
The most important   element in a story opening is your protagonist. A sloppy, casual, or plain-Jane opening line instantly makes me suspect I’m looking at the work of an author who is an outright amateur or, at the best, someone who lacks that special “it” factor that takes prose from “all right” to “awesome.”
Similarly, closing lines are every bit as important in their own right. What it means is that the essence   of your story’s questions, its angst, its focus, and its themes should all be swimming in the subtext of your opening line.

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Book Links: Poet Derek Walcott has died; Louise Erdrich wins second National Book Critics Circle Award

(Publishers Weekly)
Don’t fret over rhyme clichés, says poet Anthony Madrid. (LitHub)
Louise Erdrich and Matthew Desmond win National Book Critics Circle Awards. (McSweeney’s) (St. Nobel Laureate poet and playwright Derek Walcott has died. (Los Angeles Times)
Amy Krouse Rosenthal remembered by her editor, Maria Modugno. Lucia Star)
“Books over booze” with these 15 contemporary Irish writers. (Plume)
James Joyce awaits the annual arrival of Uncle O’Grimacey and the shamrock shake.

Help Me Finish the Creating Character Arcs Workbook

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About K.M. She is the IPPY and NIEA Award-winning and internationally published author of the Amazon bestsellers Outlining Your Novel and Structuring Your Novel. Helping Writers Become AuthorsHow to Outline Your Novel
How to Structure Your Story
How to Write Character Arcs
How to Structure Scenes
Most Common Writing Mistakes
Storytelling According to Marvel

Now Available! Weiland lives in make-believe worlds, talks to imaginary friends, and survives primarily on chocolate truffles and espresso. Weiland | @KMWeilandK.M. She writes historical and speculative fiction from her home in western Nebraska and mentors authors on her award-winning website. Subscribe to Blog Updates:

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The main difference is that the   Creating Character Arcs Workbook will offer questions and exercises to help you work through all five   different types of character arc. If you   do want all the arcs, you would end up paying more for two volumes than you would if they were all combined into one volume. Which would better suit your needs? Do you want the   Creating Character Arcs Workbook to be one or two volumes? Although having all the arcs at your fingertips will certainly be useful, you may know right away which arc you want and not necessarily need all five. I need some help. Do You Want One Workbook or Two? I’ve finished the workbook itself and am getting it ready to go to the typesetter and cover designer, with a tentative publication date in early October (just in time for NaNoWriMo!). However, if you only want either the positive arcs or the negative arcs, a single-volume version would give you arcs you don’t need at a slightly higher price point (as much as, but no more than, $5 more). So I need you to tell me—would you rather I offer all five character arcs in one volume, or would you prefer the workbook come in two separate volumes (one for the positive arcs—Positive Change and Flat—and one for the negative arcs—Disillusionment, Fall, and Corruption)? In light of the many requests I’ve received to offer a workbook companion to my latest writing book   Creating Character Arcs, I’m doing just that! However, I have a dilemma. So what do you think? Tell me in the comments! Thanks so much for your help! (E-books will be all be priced the same, which means if we split them and you want both types of arc, you’d have to pay twice as much to get both books). 2. And that brings me to my dilemma. Splitting the books into two volumes will affect the price. What Do You Think? What You Need to Know
Basically, the decision comes down to two factors:
1. Wordplayers, tell me your opinion! Although you may find cause to apply all five arcs to different characters in the same story, you will likely only need to work through one particular type of character arc per book (for your protagonist). A) A single-volume workbook, containing all five arcs, but at a slightly higher paperback price. As a result, the workbook ended up quite a bit longer than my previous workbooks—more than twice the size, in fact. Of course, I want the workbook to be as useful as possible to   you. The   Creating Character Arcs Workbook has turned out to be quite a different animal from my previously published   Outlining Your Novel Workbook and   Structuring Your Novel Workbook. B) A double-volume workbook set, one for the positive arcs and one for the negative arcs, at lower individual prices, but a higher combined price. Sign Up Today
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Book Links: New Stephen King novel will show world without women; legal battle determined by Oxford comma usage

(The New York Times)
Ivana Trump to write memoir about raising Trump children. (Electric Literature)
Kevin Young named The New Yorker‘s poetry editor. court case is based on the absence of an Oxford comma. Stephen King

Stephen King and son Owen are writing a thriller about a world without women. (Good E-Reader)
Judge’s ruling in U.S. (Salon)
Moscow closes Ukrainian Literature Library. (Literary Hub) (The Guardian)
Dan Brown holds contest for readers to design the cover of his latest novel. (Huffington Post)
NYC selects Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Americanh for its city-wide book club. (Electric Literature)
Living authors with the most film adaptations of their work. (Entertainment Weekly)
“When I was diagnosed with a terminal illness, I didn’t expect the books I taught for 30 years to define how I coped:” The solace of literature. (Origin Cover Contest)
Nebula Award–winning sci-fi author Nnedi Okarafor speaks out about the time a publisher tried to whitewash her novel’s cover.

Book Links: All-new cast for movie adaptation of latest Millennium book; literary hoaxes, the original fake news

(The Independent)
Hachette to produce audiobook versions of 50 Wattpad stories. (The Guardian)
Women writers on sexism, assault, and harassment in the literary world. Rowling fan guesses the name of the author’s new novel. (Los Angeles Business Journal)
Reflecting on opening day at this year’s London Book Fair. (Entertainment Weekly)
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Model Cara Delevingne announces novel. (Publishing Perspectives) (BuzzFeed)
2017 Man Booker International Prize longlist revealed. for brick-and-mortar store. The Girl in the Spider’s Web film adaptation sets itself apart with all-new actors. (Vanity Fair)
J.K. (Good E-Reader)
Amazon eyes L.A. (Literary Hub)
Literary hoaxes, the original fake news.

Into the Current book trailer wins SXSW award

Young partnered on the project with Chris Moberg, a motion designer and Young’s coworker at creative agency McMillan. The awards ceremony took place at the Paramount Theatre on March 14. Into the Current   was also the first book trailer to ever been screened at SXSW. The book trailer for Ottawa writer Jared Young’s debut novel Into the Current (Goose Lane Editions) has won the Jury Award for Excellence in Title Design at the South by Southwest multimedia conference and festival, up against big names like Jessica Jones, Doctor Strange, Westworld, and Stranger Things.